Bioengineering MSc

 
  

Fact file

Qualification
MSc Bioengineering
Duration
1 year full-time
Entry requirements
A high 2:2 or equivalent
Other requirements
Applicants with an Engineering or Physical Sciences degree or the BSc Biotechnology are eligible to apply.
IELTS
6.0 (no less than 5.5 in any element)

If these grades are not met, English preparatory courses are available
Start date
September
Campus
University Park Campus
School/department
Tuition fees
You can find fee information on our fees table.
 

Overview

Gain a strong foundation in modern bioengineering technology.
Read full overview

This 12 month course aims to provide science or engineering graduates from a diversity of backgrounds with a solid grounding in modern bioengineering technologies, together with options to develop an emphasis in biomechanics and biomaterials, bioimaging and biosensing and digital modelling of various human systems which will prepare students for a career in an industrial, clinical or research environment.

This course is one of two closely related bioengineering masters courses that comprise of a common core with the ability to focus on specific aspects of bioengineering.

The course has a broader scope than the other related course, allowing students to select modules related to biomaterials, biomechanics and digital modelling.

Key facts

  • The University of Nottingham has been recognised as delivering a Gold standard in the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF), which aims to recognise and reward excellent learning and teaching.
  • This multidisciplinary masters covers practical and theoretical aspects of bioengineering, including medical imaging, mathematical and engineering modelling, cell-biomaterial surface interactions, materials characterisation, functionalisation of surface, and biomechanics

 

Course details

This course may be appropriate for students who have yet to decide which area of bioengineering they wish to focus on. The principles of the course are highly relevant to the established medical device sector, the biotechnology and the emerging regenerative medicine industry.

Students will gain experience of the type of problems encountered by academic and industrial researchers, both via taught courses and project work. Written and oral presentations will be undertaken at various stages of the course.

A substantial individual project will be undertaken, developing a students' ability to engage in independent learning, and preparing them for postgraduate research or careers in industry or hospitals.

Entry requirements

Entry requirements: A high 2:2 (or international equivalent) BEng/BSc in any relevant subject. Applicants with an Engineering or Physical Sciences degree or the BSc Biotechnology are eligible to apply.

 

Academic English preparation and support

If you need additional support to take your language skills to the required level, you may be able to attend a presessional course at the Centre for English Language Education, which is accredited by the British Council for the teaching of English in the UK.

Students who successfully complete the presessional course to the required level can progress to postgraduate study without retaking IELTS or equivalent.

A specialist engineering course is available and you could be eligible for a joint offer, which means you will only need to apply for your visa once.

 

 
 

Modules

 

Core modules

  • Advanced Engineering Research Preparation (autumn): 10 credits

 

Summary of Content

A project-oriented module involving identification of methodologies and skills required for the main specialist summer MSC project. The module requires the student to examine, collect, collate, analyse data about the subject, draw conclusions and communicate this to peers and other interested parties. The module covers topics essential to research and communication in engineering projects at level 4. These include:
 

  • Library searches, literature surveys and citing references
     
  • IT: introduction to MATLAB, optimal use of Microsoft Office involving the more advanced features, effective transfer of data between applications
     
  • Communication skills: writing reports; verbal presentations, poster presentations.

Taught semesters

Autumn UK

Delivery

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Practicum 11 weeks 1 week 3 hours

Assessment method

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 10.00 Formative assessment exercise to evaluate presentation and project planning skills, in which each student will submit an A3 poster.
Coursework 2 40.00 Individual presentation exercise on a current topic of engineering interest.
Coursework 3 50.00 Data measurement & error analysis assignment. Practical assignment in which students will also demonstrate ICT competence in MATLAB and MSOffice.
 
Human Structure and Function for Engineers (autumn): 10 credits
Summary of content

This module considers aspects of human structure and function, and relevant terminology, pertaining to organ systems of interest to bioengineers including:

  • Basic anatomical and medical terminology
  • Cardiovascular system
  • Gastrointestinal system
  • Reproductive and excretory system
  • Nervous system
  • The skeletal system will be considered in greater depth with examples of normal and pathological function and engineering-based interventions.

 

Taught semesters

Autumn UK

Delivery

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Lecture 11 weeks 2 week 1 hour

 

Assessment method

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Exam 1 100.00 2-hour written examination

 

 
  • Medical Device Regulation (spring): 10 credits

Summary of content

This module is concerned with the regulatory processes applied to medical devices through all stages of development, commercial production and clinical use. The remit of the module covers both synthetic medical devices and tissue engineering regulation and, as such, consideration will include combination products and pharmaceutical regulation where appropriate. Core content will include an introduction to standards and standards organisations, biocompatibility standards, regulatory strategy, design control and risk analysis, premarket approval and clearance and manufacturing control. Core material will be delivered by University staff with up to 50% contact time given over to speakers from industry with specific experience working with medical device regulations.

Taught semesters

Spring UK

Delivery

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Lecture 12 weeks 1 week 2 hours

 

Assessment method

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 20.00  
Exam 1 80.00
 

  • Advanced Engineering Research Project Organisation and Design (spring): 10 credits

Summary of content

A project-oriented module involving a review of publications and views on a topic allied to the chosen specialist subject. The module will also involve organisation and design of the main project. Skills will be acquired through workshops and seminars that will include:
 

  • Further programming in MATLAB and /or MSExcel Macros
     
  • Project planning and use of Microsoft Project
     
  • Measurement and error analysis
     
  • Development of laboratory skills including safety & risk assessment

Students will select a further set of specialist seminars from, e.g.:

  • Meshing for computational engineering applications
     
  • Modelling using CAE packages
     
  • Use of CES Selector software
     
  • Specific laboratory familiarisation
     
  • Use of MSVisio software for process flow
     
  • Use of HYSYS process modelling software
     
  • Use of PSpice to simulate analogue and digital circuits

The specialist seminars will be organised within the individual MSc courses.

Semesters

Spring UK

Delivery

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Seminar 12 weeks 1 week 3 hours

Assessment method

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 40.00 2000 word literature review on a topic relevant to MSc programme.
Coursework 2   Formative health & safety risk assessment
Coursework 3 60.00 2000 word max planning report; topics to be specific to individual MSc courses and specialist training
 
Advanced Engineering Research Project (summer): 60 credits
Summary of content

This project involves individual students in undertaking an original, independent, research study into an engineering topic appropriate to their specific MSc programme. The project may be undertaken on any topic which is relevant to the MSc stream, as agreed by the relevant Course Director and project tutor. In undertaking the project, students should draw on and extend material presented in the course. The project has several aims, beyond reinforcing information and methodology presented in the taught modules; the student is expected to develop skills in research, investigation, planning, evaluation and oral and written communication. Final reporting will take the form of a written account including a literature review and an account of the student’s contribution. A presentation will be made to academic staff towards the end of the project.

Semester

Summer UK

Delivery

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Un Assign   0.00 week

Assessment method

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 65.00 Written report (10000 words maximum)
Coursework 2 15.00 Continuous assessment of the student
Coursework 3 10.00 Interim report (1500 words maximum)
Presentation 1 10.00 Oral Presentation (peer marked and with 1 staff)

 

 

Students must take 30 credits from group  1, 2 or 3 in the autumn semester, and 40 credits from group 1 or 2 in the spring semester.


Optional modules (group 1)

  • Biomedical Applications of Biomaterials (autumn): 20 credits

 

Course summary

This module is concerned with the biomedical application of materials. It addresses three key areas: 

1. The clinical need for materials in medicine. An outline of cases where disease and trauma can be treated using materials and the tissues involved. 

2. The biological responses to materials in the body. Specifically the effect of the biological environment on materials and the effect of implantation of materials on the body. 

3. The application of materials in medicine. The material requirements, surgical procedures and expected biological performance of biomaterials. The advantages and disadvantages of using different types of materials and the importance of the design of medical implants.

Taught semesters

Autumn UK

Delivery

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Lecture 11 weeks 1 week 2 hours
Practicum 11 weeks 1 week 2 hours

 

Assessment method

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 20.00 Laboratory report
Coursework 2 20.00 Clinical observation report
Exam 1 60.00 Closed book exam. 2 hours.

 

 

 

 

Advanced Biomaterial Structures (autumn): 10 credits

Course summary

This module is concerned with the development and fabrication of Biomaterial Structures including the characterisation and modification of the physical and chemical properties of biomaterial sturctures. Particular emphasis will be given to polymeric, metallic and ceramic structures that can be readily processed, modified or coated for different biomedical applications. This will include both porous and solid surface structures. Examples structures will be investigated from existing implant materials, inorganic and organic surface modications to structures for tissue engineering.

Taught semesters

Autumn UK

Delivery

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Lecture 11 weeks 1 week 2 hours

 

Assessment method

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Assignment 10.00 Poster case study
Presentation 1 10.00 Short presentation
Exam 1 80.00 Useen examination 2 hours
 

 

Optional modules (group 2)

  • Digital Signal Processing for Telecommunications, Multimedia and Instrumentation (autumn): 10 credits

 

Course summary

This module focuses on applications of digital signal processing. The module covers:

  1. revision of continuous signals, linear time-invariant systems and Fourier transform
  2. sampling of analogue signals, discrete time-invariant systems and discrete Fourier transform
  3. signal enhancement techniques
  4. digital spectral analysis
  5. design of digital filters
  6. adaptive signal processing
  7. image processing
  8. implementations of digital signal processing
  9. use of MATLAB for signal processing

Taught semesters

Autumn UK

Delivery

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Lecture 11 weeks 1 week 2 hours
Workshop 11 weeks 1 week 1 hour

Assessment method

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 30.00 15 hours of student time
Exam 1 70.00 There will be one exam, 40% of this is based on multiple choice questions; 30% based on compulsory regular questions and 30% based on the optional question selected from the two on offer

 

 
    • Bioelectronic and Biophotonic Interfacing (autumn): 10 credits
Course summary

This module explores the design of interfaces between technology and biology. It will cover the use of a variety of physical phenomena, including electrical and optical signals, to both monitor and control biological systems. Technology used in research laboratories, medical diagnostic equipment and personal electronic devices will be considered. The module will emphasise the design of practical technology.

Topics covered include:

  • Basic physical principles

  • Basic biological principles

  • Electronic interfacing

  • Optical interfacing

  • Magnetic interfacing


Taught semesters

Autumn UK


Delivery

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Lecture 11 weeks 1 week 2 hours

Assessment method

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Exam 1 100.00  

 

 

Advanced Biomaterial Structures (autumn): 10 credits

Course summary

This module is concerned with the development and fabrication of Biomaterial Structures including the characterisation and modification of the physical and chemical properties of biomaterial sturctures. Particular emphasis will be given to polymeric, metallic and ceramic structures that can be readily processed, modified or coated for different biomedical applications. This will include both porous and solid surface structures. Examples structures will be investigated from existing implant materials, inorganic and organic surface modications to structures for tissue engineering.


Taught semesters

Autumn UK

Delivery

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Lecture 11 weeks 1 week 2 hours

Assessment method

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Assignment 10.00 Poster case study
Presentation 1 10.00 Short presentation
Exam 1 80.00 Useen examination 2 hours
 



Optional modules (group 3)

  • Simulation and Digital Human Modelling (autumn): 10 credits
Course summary

For Human Factors/Ergonomics work, computers can render digital representations of people with varying characteristics performing a multitude of tasks within simulated environments. Moreover, simulation tools can enable designers, managers and end-users to experience products and systems in realistic, interactive environments. Such advancements have significant cost implications, enabling designs and their implications to be visualised early in the development lifecycle. 

This module will provide students with the knowledge and skills required to understand and utilise computers as Human Factors tools for modelling people and systems (tasks, interfaces, environments). The module is largely practically-oriented and students will make extensive use of digital human modelling software (e.g. Jack) and the simulation facilities (e.g. car, motorcycle and train simulators) available within the Human Factors Research Group.

The syllabus covers: Algorithms and use of avatars for modelling human physical characteristics (e.g. body dimensions, static and dynamic postures); Modelling of perceptual and cognitive variability (e.g. sensory abilities, emotive responses); Virtual reality technologies/environments; Validity of simulators; Presence factors for simulation; Understanding and minimising simulator sickness; Case studies in the use of digital human modelling and simulators as Human Factors tools.


Taught semesters

Autumn UK


Delivery

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Lecture 11 weeks 1 week 2 hours
Practicum 11 weeks 1 week 2 hours

Assessment method

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 50.00 Report (approx. 3000 words) on the use of simulation to aid in the design/evaluation of specific products
Coursework 2 50.00 Presentation arguing for the use of digital human modelling within a specific design context

 

 

 

Students must either take 40 credits from group 4 or group 5, below:

 

Optional modules (group 4)

  • Biomechanics (spring): 10 credits

 

Course summary
  • This module considers aspects of experimental and theoretical biomechanics including:
  • Mechanical properties of biological tissues:
  • Hard tissues including bone;
  • Soft tissues including cartilage, tendon, disc and blood vessels;
  • Time dependent behaviour;
  • Experimental techniques
  • Impact mechanics
  • Modelling
  • Custom implants


Taught semesters

Spring UK


Delivery

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Lecture 10 weeks 2 week 1 hour


Assessment method

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Exam 1 100.00 2-hour written exam

 

 

 

  • Advanced Materials (spring): 10 credits

Course summary

MM4ADM is a module which requires personal engagement in the classes and there is no examination. In this way MM4ADM is like the Individual Project. MM4ADM has FOUR CYCLES each comprising students individually preparing a talk, and report, on a topic within a theme and with a title that has been negotiated with the MM4ADM Teachers (Prof AB Seddon, Dr E Barney and Dr I Ahmed) straight after the Teachers have delivered an introductory lecture on that theme. The point of the module is to improve oral presentation and engineering report-writing skills using advanced materials as a vehicle. The classes are seminars where good practice is openly discussed and materials' advantages and disadvantages are openly debated. Not to attend classes is not an option or failure of the module at the end is very likely to ensue. This module is designed to deal with a wide range of materials (including advanced metallic, ceramic, glass, composite and polymeric-based materials) for a wide range of applications. Also it considers materials and themes such as: aerospace materials, medical materials, coatings, carbon-based materials and so on. The module deals with: the underlying principles behind the suitability of material properties for the targeted applications; the processing of these materials; the effects of processing on their subsequent structure and properties and ultimate performance.


Taught semesters

Spring UK


Delivery

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Seminar 12 weeks 2 week 2 hours



Assessment method

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 30.00 Case study 1, 2000 word report and oral/visual presentation
Coursework 2 35.00 Case study 2, 2000 word report and oral/visual presentation
Coursework 3 35.00 Case study 3, 2000 word report and oral/visual presentation

 

 

 

  • Cell-Material Interactions (spring): 10 credits

 

Course summary

This module is concerned with the cell and protein interactions with biomaterial surfaces. Particular emphasis will be given to understanding how alterations in selected surface properties may influence biological responses and how this knowledge may be exploited for different biomedical applications. This will include optimisation/functionalisation of surfaces by modification of coatings. Examples will be investigated including existing approaches and more recent research in applications for both tissue replacement and tissue repair.


Taught semesters

Spring UK


Delivery

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Lecture 12 weeks 1 week 2 hours



Assessment method

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 10.00 Report/Case study
Coursework 2 10.00 Prepared short presentation
Exam 1 80.00 closed book exam. 2 hours.

 

 

 

  • Spinal Biomechanics and Instrumentation (spring): 10 credits

Course summary

This module considers aspects of experimental and theoretical spinal biomechanics including:

  • Mechanical properties of the spine:
  • Intervertebral discs
  • Spinal ligaments
  • Vertebrae
  • Experimental techniques
  • Modelling
  • Implant design
  • Mechanics of surgical procedures


Taught semesters

Spring UK


Delivery

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Lecture 12 weeks 2 week 1 hour



Assessment method

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Exam 1 100.00 2-hour written exam
 

 

Optional modules (group 5)

 

  • Biomechanics (spring): 10 credits

 

Course summary
  • This module considers aspects of experimental and theoretical biomechanics including:
  • Mechanical properties of biological tissues:
  • Hard tissues including bone;
  • Soft tissues including cartilage, tendon, disc and blood vessels;
  • Time dependent behaviour;
  • Experimental techniques
  • Impact mechanics
  • Modelling
  • Custom implants


Taught semesters

Spring UK


Delivery

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Lecture 10 weeks 2 week 1 hour


Assessment method

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Exam 1 100.00 2-hour written exam

 

 

 

  • Biomaterials Modelling (spring): 10 credits

Course summary

Mathematical methods have much to offer by way of providing qualitative and quantitative insight into a wide range of bioengineering issues. This course will provide some of the mathematical background needed to formulate models for mass transport, fluid flow and tissue mechanics, for example, and some of the methods adopted to analyse such models. Some widely-used statistical methods will also be introduced. The course will cover the following topics:

    • Introduction to mathematical modelling procedures (phenomenological, statistical and mechanistic).
    • Differential equation formulations (examples, analytical, graphical and computational methods; ordinary and partial).
    • Statistical methods.
    • A range of case studies


Taught semesters

Spring UK


Delivery

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Lecture 10 weeks 1 week 2 hours

 

Assessment method

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Exam 1 100.00 2-hour written examination
 

 

  • Cell Material Interactions (spring): 10 credits
Course summary

This module is concerned with the cell and protein interactions with biomaterial surfaces. Particular emphasis will be given to understanding how alterations in selected surface properties may influence biological responses and how this knowledge may be exploited for different biomedical applications. This will include optimisation/functionalisation of surfaces by modification of coatings. Examples will be investigated including existing approaches and more recent research in applications for both tissue replacement and tissue repair.


Taught semesters

Spring UK


Delivery

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Lecture 12 weeks 1 week 2 hours



Assessment method

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 10.00 Report/Case study
Coursework 2 10.00 Prepared short presentation
Exam 1 80.00 closed book exam. 2 hours.

 

 

The modules we offer are inspired by the research interests of our staff and as a result may change for reasons of, for example, research developments or legislation changes. This list is an example of typical modules we offer, not a definitive list.

 
 

Funding

See information on how to fund your masters, including our step-by-step guide.

Please visit the faculty website for information on any scholarships currently available through the faculty.

Faculty of Engineering Scholarships

UK/EU Students

Funding information can be found on the Graduate School website.

Please visit the faculty website for information on any scholarships currently available through the faculty.

Government loans for masters courses

The Government offers postgraduate student loans for students studying a taught or research masters course. Applicants must ordinarily live in England or the EU. Student loans are also available for students from Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland.

International and EU students

Masters scholarships are available for international students from a wide variety of countries and areas of study. You must already have an offer to study at Nottingham to apply. Please note closing dates to ensure your course application is submitted in good time.

Information and advice on funding your degree, living costs and working while you study is available on our website, as well as country-specific resources.

 
 

Careers

This course offers students specific skills suitable for a wide range of careers in UK and international organisations involved in biomaterials and medical device development. This course provides a firm foundation for a research path in materials engineering for tissue repair and regeneration.

Career Prospects and Employability

The University of Nottingham is consistently named as one of the most targeted universities by Britain’s leading graduate employers* and can offer you a head-start when it comes to your career.  

Those who take up a postgraduate research opportunity with us will not only receive support in terms of close contact with supervisors and specific training related to your area of research, you will also benefit from dedicated careers advice from our Careers and Employability Service.  

Our Careers and Employability Service offers a range of services including advice sessions, employer events, recruitment fairs and skills workshops – and once you have graduated, you will have access to the service for life.

*The Graduate Market 2013-2017, High Fliers Research.

Average starting salary and career progression

In 2016, 94.9% of postgraduates in engineering faculty courses who were available for employment had secured work or further study within six months of graduation. The average starting salary was £35,550 with the highest being £100,000.

*Known destinations of full-time home higher degree postgraduates, 2015/16. Salaries are calculated based on those in full-time paid employment within the UK.

 
 
 
Explore it - Virtual Nottingham

Disclaimer
This online prospectus has been drafted in advance of the academic year to which it applies. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information is accurate at the time of publishing, but changes (for example to course content) are likely to occur given the interval between publishing and commencement of the course. It is therefore very important to check this website for any updates before you apply for the course where there has been an interval between you reading this website and applying.

Get in touch
+44 (0)115 95 13882
Make an enquiry

Contact

Marzena Newton
Faculty of Engineering
Coates Building
University Park
The University of Nottingham
Nottingham
NG7 2RD
Engineering videos

Engineering videos

 
 

Student Recruitment Enquiries Centre

The University of Nottingham
King's Meadow Campus
Lenton Lane
Nottingham, NG7 2NR

t: +44 (0) 115 951 5559
f: +44 (0) 115 951 5812
w: Frequently asked questions
Make an enquiry