Postgraduate study
This course provides advanced understanding of mechanical engineering, offering streams for a particular specialisation.
 
  
Qualification
MSc Mechanical Engineering
Duration
1 year full-time, or up to 3 years part-time
Entry requirements
Upper second class Bachelor of Engineering (BEng) degree or BSc in a relevant subject (or international equivalent).
Other requirements
Applications from students with non-engineering background will be considered if they have good academic credentials (a minimum of upper 2.1 BEng/BSc Honours degree) and strong motivations to study Mechanical Engineering.
IELTS
6.5 (no less than 6.0 in any element) If these grades are not met, English preparatory courses are available

If these grades are not met, English preparatory courses may be available
Start date
September
UK/EU fees
£7,785 - Terms apply
International fees
£22,815 - Terms apply
Accreditation
This course is accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers.
Campus
University Park Campus
 

 

Overview

This MSc course offers the chance to study advanced topics in mechanical engineering.

Building upon this broad base, we offer a number of streams which allow you to specialise in one particular area including aerospace, automotive, manufacturing, or a general advanced mechanical engineering option.

These streams build on our key research and academic strengths, along with our strong industrial links.

Modules and projects are delivered by internationally recognised experts in the area, including specialist lectures from industrial experts.

Key facts

  • This suite of MSc programmes in mechanical engineering offers specialist streams linked to our world-leading research activities and centres.
  • This course is accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers.
       IME-logo

  • This course is also taught at The University of Nottingham's Malaysia Campus.
  • This course is also available part-time, for up to 3 years.
  • The Faculty of Engineering is ranked 3rd in the UK for research power under REF 2014, the British Government’s Research Excellence Framework. More than 98% of engineering research ranked of international quality, with 85% graded as world leading or internationally excellent.
  • The University of Nottingham has been recognised as delivering a Gold standard in the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF), which aims to recognise and reward excellent learning and teaching.
 

Full course details

MSc Mech Eng
Current MSc Mechanical Engineering students with their personal tutors
 

Mechanical engineers apply their scientific knowledge to solve problems and design machines that help us to enjoy a better lifestyle. As a mechanical engineer you may work in design, development, research, consultancy, manufacture or marketing, combining technical and managerial experience.

Whether you are a UK student, looking to complete your studies towards requirements for chartered status, or an overseas student, looking to study at one of the leading UK engineering faculties, this could be the course for you. 

The MSc programme is a full-time degree course studied over a period of one calendar year beginning in late September. However the programme may be taken part-time over (up to) three years. This can be done by taking the taught modules flexibly in each semester to accumulate 120 credits in total (The basic structure of each taught semester is 11 weeks of teaching followed by a period for revision and examinations).

The individual project worth 60 credits can be started any time after at least 80 credits of taught modules are passed.

This 12 month course offers four different streams which allow you to specialise in one particular area:

  • Advanced Mechanical Engineering: You will be able to choose from a number of optional modules, in addition to the core modules, in order to create a more generalised path of study for the award of MSc Mechanical Engineering.
  • Aerospace: A flexible alternative to an aerospace engineering programme. Aerospace companies predominantly employ mechanical engineers in their professional engineering cohort. Graduating as a mechanical engineer with a focus on aerospace makes you attractive to the aerospace industry without removing the option of working in any of the other industrial sectors. In addition the course will provide insight into aerospace engineering research, via specialist modules delivered by leading researchers and an aerospace focused individual project.
  • Automotive: A flexible alternative to an automotive engineering programme. This course is designed for people who think they would like to work in the automotive industry. By having a masters degree in mechanical engineering (automotive) it is immediately apparent to a potential employer that you have all the core skills a mechanical engineer would be expected to have and that you have chosen to specialise in modules relevant to automotive. In addition the course will provide insight into automotive engineering research – via specialist modules delivered by leading researchers and an automotive focused individual project.
  • Manufacturing: The course provides a unique combination of engineering science, design, and manufacturing engineering required for a career in the manufacturing sector. Employment prospects are excellent for highly motivated students on this course, fascinated by engineering with a strong interest in manufacturing.

MSc Mechanical Engineering (part-time)

The MSc programme is a full time degree course studied over a period of one calendar year, beginning in late September. However the programme may be taken part-time over up to three years. This can be done by taking the taught modules flexibly in each semester to accumulate 120 credits in total. (The basic structure of each taught semester is 11 weeks of teaching followed by a period for revision and examinations). The individual project worth 60 credits can be started any time after at least 80 credits of taught modules are passed.

The taught subject programme consists of units called modules totalling 120 credits. Each module has a credit value, normally 10 credits, although some taught modules have values of 5 or 15 credits and the individual project module has 60 credits. A 10 credit module represents approximately 100 hours of student learning, teaching and assessment. To gain an MSc the number and level of credits must abide by the University Qualifications Framework.

Academic English preparation and support

If you need additional support to take your language skills to the required level, you may be able to attend a presessional course at the Centre for English Language Education, which is accredited by the British Council for the teaching of English in the UK.

Students who successfully complete the presessional course to the required level can progress to postgraduate study without retaking IELTS or equivalent.

A specialist engineering course is available and you could be eligible for a joint offer, which means you will only need to apply for your visa once.

 

 
 

Modules

Mechanical Engineering Streams

Each stream offers common core modules, listed below:

  • Advanced Engineering Design: MM4AED (20 credits)

Summary of Content: The project involves five students working as a team to design a product from initial concept to fully engineered drawings. Starting from a design brief prepared by the supervisor or ‘client’, the group will be required to devise and evaluate alternative design concepts, undertake the detailed engineering analysis and mechanical design, select suitable materials and methods of manufacture and assess costs and the marketability of the product, manufacture a prototype or proof of concept and evaluate its performance.

Method and Frequency of Class:

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Computing 5 weeks 1 week 2 hours
Lecture 11 weeks 1 week 2 hours
Practicum 6 weeks 1 week 2 hours
Tutorial 11 weeks 1 week 1 hour

 

The three hour lecture is a lecture/seminar (design tutorial).The project is of 10 weeks' duration with an introductory week. There will be regular weekly contact with the supervisor/module convener and students are responsible for arranging their own group meetings.

Method of Assessment:

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 60.00 Design/drawings/diagrams/prototype or proof of concept, and the associated 5,000 word report
Coursework 2 40.00 Final submission engineering drawings, interim / presentations/design reviews, /continuous and peer assessment of each students planning, initiative, judgement and insight.

 

 
  • Integrated Systems Analysis MM4ISA (10 credits)
Summary Of Content: This module covers topics aligned to the design, description and analysis of dynamically complex, integrated systems. Examples of such include automotive power trains, aero-engines and combined heat and power generating plant. Topics cover:
  • A brief overview of Systems Engineering, the role of Systems Analysis within that and optimisation as related to the engineering of systems
  • Basic concepts in Design of Experiments and the analysis of experiments including the effects of noise
  • Reliability of systems - reliability models for components and how these are combined to form system reliability assessments
  • Dynamic behaviour of systems : introduction to the state-space protocol and dynamic simulation of systems

Emphasis throughout the course will be on real applications and tasks involved in the engineering of 'integrated systems' products. 

Method and Frequency of Class:

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Computing 1 week 1 week 2 hours
Lecture 11 weeks 1 week 2 hours

The module convenor will be available in prescribed evening slots in a PC laboratory to resolve questions arising from worksheets or the use of MATLAB to support the coursework or exercise sheet solutions. In Week 2, a timetabled 2-hour session in a PC laboratory will replace the normal lecture.  This session will provide preliminary training in SIMULINK for solving general simulation problems.

Method of Assessment:

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 20.00 System Simulation Exercise (short report consisting of 4 clearly defined tasks).
Coursework 2 20.00 Design of Experiments Assignment (short report consisting of 4 clearly defined tasks).
Exam 1 60.00 Examination
 
  • Advanced Technology Review MM4ATR (10 credits)
Summary Of Content: Following an introductory lecture, lectures are split into four blocks of approximately 5 hours. The first block will look generically at new technology development and introduction focussing on innovation, funding and decision-making processes.

The remaining three blocks will each cover an engineering topic dealing with new and/or rapidly developing technologies with important applications. Coverage of each subject will typically include

  • a review of background and context, importance, and pressures driving development
  • engineering principles, current research and development objectives and progress being made
  • case study illustration(s)
  • analysis of prospects, technology transfer, market applications, challenges and imperatives

Topics are selected each year to reflect current developments and issues; one or more topics may be changed each time the module is run. These topics will be associated with activities in major segments of manufacturing or service industries or of generic technologies. In each case, emphasis will be placed on review and analysis.

The courseworks entail a group case study on a new and/or rapidly advancing engineering technology of individual choice and an individual coursework based on the lecture programme.

Method and Frequency of Class:

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Lecture 1 week 1 week 2 hours
Lecture 12 weeks 1 week 2 hours
One 2-hour lecture per week.

Method of Assessment:

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 60.00 Individual coursework based on lectures
Coursework 2 10.00 Case study paper and synopsis
Coursework 3 30.00 Case study report
 
  • Advanced Research Project Organisation and Design : H14POD (10 credits)

Summary Of Content

A project-oriented module involving a review of publications and views on a topic allied to the chosen specialist subject. The module will also involve organisation and design of the main project. Skills will be acquired through workshops and seminars that will include:

  • Further programming in MATLAB and /or MSExcel Macros
  • Project planning and use of Microsoft Project
  • Measurement and error analysis
  • Development of laboratory skills including safety & risk assessment

Students will select a further set of specialist seminars from, e.g.:

  • Meshing for computational engineering applications
  • Modelling using CAE packages
  • Use of CES Selector software
  • Specific laboratory familiarisation
  • Use of MSVisio software for process flow
  • Use of HYSYS process modelling software
  • Use of PSpice to simulate analogue and digital circuits

The specialist seminars will be organised within the individual MSc courses.

Taught Semesters: Spring UK 

Delivery: 3-hour seminars in 12 weeks 

Method of Assessment:

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 40.00 2000 word literature review on a topic relevant to MSc programme.
Coursework 2   Formative health & safety risk assessment
Coursework 3 60.00 2000 word max planning report; topics to be specific to individual MSc courses and specialist training
 
Individual postgraduate project MM4IPP (60 credits)
Summary Of Content: This project involves students undertaking an original, independent, research study into an engineering or industrial topic appropriate to their specific MSc programme. The project should be carried out in a professional manner and may be undertaken on any topic which is relevant to the MSc programme, as agreed by the relevant Course Director and module convenor.

The project has several aims, beyond reinforcing information and methodology presented in the taught modules; the student is expected to develop skills in research, investigation, planning, evaluation and oral and written communication. Final reporting will take the form of a written account including a literature review and an account of the student’s contribution. A presentation will be made to academic staff towards the end of the project.

For the Manufacturing Technology Engineering Doctorate the research project will form part of the research portfolio for the candidate.

Method and Frequency of Class: There will be a one hour introductory session/ session via Moodle . All other activities are arranged on an individual basis between the student and the project supervisor.

Method of Assessment:

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 10.00 Interim Report (Marked by project supervisor)
Coursework 2 15.00 Supervisor assessment of student input and professionalism (marked by project supervisor)
Coursework 3 10.00 15 minute oral presentation (peer marked and with 1 staff)
Coursework 4 65.00 Dissertation (10,000 word limit)

 

The project is completed over the summer. The project area is flexible and will be supervised by an academic member of staff.

Previous research projects have included:

  • A study in underbody aerodynamics for motorsport applications
  • Trust of rear facing passengers in autonomous vehicles
  • Simulation of effect of defects on fatigue life of additive manufactured Ti-6AL-4V
  • An investigation into passenger attitudes towards automation
  • Research on durable polymer nanocomposite coatings for aerospace applications
  • Control and validation of walking robot leg system
  • Craze modelling in polystyrene using finite element analysis
  • Experimental studies of power losses and flow visualisation in gearboxes due to churning
  • Design analysis of a hybrid fixture system
  • Hydraulically assisted turbocharger – kinetic energy recovery boosting system
  • A micro-robot used for engine internal detection
 

Then a choice of either:

Finite Element Analysis MM4FEA (20 credits)
Summary Of Content: An introductory module on finite element analysis, covering:
  • Structural analysis
  • Derivation of finite element equations using energy considerations
  • Linear and quadratic elements
  • Beam, plate and shell elements
  • Practical applications of finite elements in stress analysis problems
  • Examples of finite element applications
  • Introduction to thermal problems
  • Introduction to non-linear problems

This module does not cover computer programming or hands-on sessions on the use of commercial finite element software.

Method and Frequency of Class:

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Lecture 12 weeks 1 week 3 hours

Activities may take place every teaching week of the Semester or only in specified weeks. It is usually specified above if an activity only takes place in some weeks of a Semester.

Method of Assessment:

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 20.00 2 assignments
Exam 1 80.00 2 hour exam
 

OR

Computational Fluid Dynamics MM4CFD (20 credits)
Summary of Content: This module consists of:
  • Indroduction
  • Fundamental CFD theory
  • Turbulence
  • Multiphase
  • Reactive Flow
  • Quality Assurance

Method and Frequency of Class:

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Computing 8 weeks 1 week 2 hours
Lecture 11 weeks 2 week 1 hour
Un Assign 5 weeks 1 week 2 hours

Activities may take place every teaching week of the Semester or only in specified weeks. It is usually specified above if an activity only takes place in some weeks of a Semester.

Method of Assessment:

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 50.00 Individual project up to 4000 words
Exam 1 50.00 2-hour written examination
 

 


Each stream then includes the following different modules:

Advanced Mechanical Engineering

Introduction to Turbulence and Turbulent Flows MM4TTF (10 credits)
Summary Of Content: An advanced module in fluid mechanics applicable to a wide range of engineering disciplines. Topics to be covered include:
  • fundamental theory of turbulence
  • statistical description of turbulence
  • boundary layer structures
  • turbulent flow control
  • turbulence modelling and CFD
  • experimental techniques
  • practical and industrial examples 

Method and Frequency of Class:

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Lecture 11 weeks 1 week 2 hours
This module includes two case studies.

Method of Assessment:

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 30.00 Assessed extended laboratory report based on experimental data on turbulent boundary layer taken in the wind tunnel.  Covering & discussing points specified by the convenor.
Exam 1 70.00 Closed book examination.
 
  • Stress Analysis MM3SAM (20 credits)
Summary of Content: An advanced module dealing with two parts, 1] Analytical, experimental and numerical methods for determining stresses and deformations in engineering components; and 2] Constitutive models and modes of failure in engineering materials and components. The topics covered include.

Part 1: Stress Analysis

  • Beams on elastic foundations
  • Bending of flat plates
  • Membrane stress of thin shells of revolution
  • Bending of cylindrical shells
  • Torsion of thin-walled prismatic bars
  • Stress concentration
  • Experimental: Electrical resistance strain gauges, Moiré method.
  • Numerical: Finite element techniques

Part 2: Material Models

  • Elasticity and Anisotropy
  • Plasticity
  • Fatigue
  • Fracture
  • Creep and Creep Fatigue Interaction
  • Impact

Method and Frequency of Class:

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Lecture 12 weeks 1 week 4 hours

Activities may take place every teaching week of the Semester or only in specified weeks. It is usually specified above if an activity only takes place in some weeks of a Semester.

Method of Assessment: Exam (100%) - one 2 hour exam.

 

+20 credits of of optional modules, of which 10 credits or more must be level 4 modules.


Aerospace

Introduction to Aerospace Technology MM3AET (10 credits)

Summary Of Content: The aim of this module is to provide an introduction to most of the main fields within Aerospace technology such that students understand the basics and are equipped to understand 'what there is to know' in this field. The main topics covered are:
  • A brief history of aircraft
  • Aerodynamics
  • An introduction to Aircraft Propulsion
  • An introduction to Flight dynamics
  • An introduction to aerospace materials and structures
  • A brief overview of Astronauts and Space
  • A brief introduction to Rotorcraft
  • Airworthiness
  • An introduction to Avionics
  • Future developments in aircraft

Method and Frequency of Class: 2-hour lectures in 11 weeks 

Method of Assessment:

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 30.00 Group submission (groups of 4)
Exam 1 70.00 one 2 hour exam
 
  • Aerodynamics MM4AER (10 credits)

Summary Of Content: 

  • Introduction to Aerodynamics.
  • Inviscid, irrotational and incompressible flow: potential flow solutions, source and sinks, doublets, vortex, circular cylinder placed in a uniform flow, Kutta-Joukowski theorem on lift, the Kutta condition, Biot-Savart law.
  • Two-dimensional aerofoils: thin flat-plate aerofoil, thick cambered aerofoil, aerofoil nomenclature, NACA aerofoils, pressure distributions, flow separations, lift and drag curves.
  • Finite-span wings: induced drag, downwash angle, effect of aspect ratio, Delta wings, vortex breakdown.
  • Boundary-layer control: stalling speed, high-lift devices, flaps, slats, Gurney flaps, winglets, vortex generators, wall suction, riblets.

 Method and Frequency of Class:

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Lecture 12 weeks 1 week 2 hours

This module includes one case study based on the laboratory experiment on aerofoil aerodynamics. The attendance to the laboratory is required for a submission of the coursework. 

Method of Assessment:

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 30.00 Assessed extended laboratory report.
Exam 1 70.00 Closed book examination - 2 hours
 
  • Aircraft Propulsion Systems MM4APS (10 credits)

Summary Of Content: An advanced module covering the following topics:
  • Principles of aircraft jet propulsion
  • Principles of the gas turbine engine
  • Layout of jet engines
  • Compressible flow in gas turbine engines
  • Principles of turbomachinery as applied to gas turbine engines
  • Characteristics of main components of a jet engine
  • Design of aircraft engines

Method and Frequency of Class:

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Computing 5 weeks 1 week 1 hour
Lecture 10 weeks 1 week 1 hour
Lecture 6 weeks 2 week 1 hour

Activities may take place every teaching week of the Semester or only in specified weeks. It is usually specified above if an activity only takes place in some weeks of a Semester.

Method of Assessment:

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Assignment 30.00 Individual project, up to 3000 words
Exam 1 70.00 2 hour exam
 

+ 20 credits of optional modules, which can be either Level 3 or Level 4 modules


Automotive

  • Internal Combustion Engines MM4ICE (10 credits)

Summary Of Content:
  • Design features, function and layout
  • Performance, efficiency and energy flows
  • Fuel delivery and gas exchange processes
  • Combustion, heat release and work transfer
  • Coolant system and heat rejection
  • Lubrication system and friction
  • Aftertreatment system, emissions and test regulations

Method and Frequency of Class: 2-hour lectures each week in 11 weeks.

Method of Assessment: one closed book examination (100%).

 
  • Introduction to Automotive Technology MM3AUT (10 credits)

Summary Of Content: For each of the following subject areas, the historical evolution of design of the component is considered with regard to the influences of performance optimisation, cost, and legislative requirements:
  • •Engine (i.c. types and development trends, fuel economy and emissions, alternative and hybrid powertrains)
  • •Transmission (manual and auto gearbox, differential, 2- and 4WD systems)
  • •Body/chassis (skeletal and unitary constructions, crashworthiness, aerodynamics)
  • •Control systems (steering and linkage, braking inc. ABS and traction/stability control)
  • •Suspension (arrangements, handling/dynamics)

Method and Frequency of Class: 2-hour leacture each week in 11 weeks. 
Activities may take place every teaching week of the Semester or only in specified weeks. It is usually specified above if an activity only takes place in some weeks of a Semester

Method of Assessment: one 2-hour exam (100%)

 
  • Automotive Vehicle Dynamics MM4AVD (10 credits)

Summary Of Content: The module covers the following topics:
  • •Tyre forces and tyre modelling
  • •Ride comfort: random vibration, road surface roughness, human tolerance limits, the quarter-vehicle model
  • •Lateral vehicle dynamics: handling and stability, understeer/oversteer
  • •Simulation tools and model building: special reference to Matlab
  • •Overview of vehicle chassis enhancement by electronic control, e.g. anti-lock braking systems, traction control, dynamic stability control, etc.

Examples and applications of the concepts and techniques developed are given on passenger cars, heavy vehicles and motorcycles.

Method and Frequency of Class: 2-hour lectures each week in 12 weeks.

Method of Assessment:

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 20.00 Analytical/Computational Assignment: 1500 words
Exam 1 80.00 2 hour closed book examination
 
+ 20 credits of electives, which can be either Level 3 or Level 4 Modules.

 


 

Manufacturing

  • Manufacturing Process CapabilityMM3MPC (10 credits)

Summary Of Content: The module will give students in depth understanding of technical capability of modern manufacturing processes in relation to product design. This will enable the analysis of various manufacturing processes, tooling designs/machinery and their capability to achieve the required product quality measures.

Firstly, The module will discuss the capability of some single manufacturing processes in respect to: particularities in tooling designs; characteristic machinery calculations; workpiece materials and their mechanical/metallurgical properties after processing; dimensional/geometrical tolerance of manufactured components, surface finish; part geometrical restrictions; process productivity; cost analysis in relation to the production scale.

Secondly, the module will take into discussion the capability of interconnected manufacturing processes in respect to: compatibility of coupling manufacturing processes; production size; cost analysis on interconnected manufacturing processes.

 Method and Frequency of Class:

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Lecture 11 weeks 1 week 2 hours
Seminar 11 weeks 1 week 2 hours

Activities may take place every teaching week of the Semester or only in specified weeks. It is usually specified above if an activity only takes place in some weeks of a Semester.

Method of Assessment:

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 2 30.00 Advanced knowledge of manufacturing technology and engineering design
Exam 1 70.00 Knowledge of evaluating the capability of various manufacturing processes
 
  • Flexible Automated Manufacturing MM3FAM (10 credits)

Summary Of Content: This module gives students a detailed understanding of the important aspects of advanced automated manufacturing principles. Links to computer integrated manufacturing and implications of mass customisation on automated manufacturing systems are being explored. The impact of enterprise agility on their manufacturing facilities is being examined. Procedures for assessing the advantages and disadvantages of various systems are examined through the use of case studies.

Method and Frequency of Class:

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Lecture 11 weeks 1 week 2 hours
Seminar 10 weeks 1 week 2 hours
Workshop 8 weeks 1 week 2 hours

Activities may  take place every teaching week of the Semester or only in specified weeks. It is usually specified above if an activity only takes place in some weeks of a Semester.

Method of Assessment:

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 30.00 Group Project: FMS design for product families.
Coursework 2 10.00 Lab report
Exam 1 60.00 1.5 hour exam
 
  • Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing MM4AMG (10 credits)

Summary Of Content: This module will cover design, processing and material aspects of Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing technologies, as well as the current and potential applications of the technology in a wide variety of sectors. Topics addressed will include commercial and experimental systems, material requirements, design for Additive Manufacturing, software and systems, as well as case studies of AM in industry and society.

Method and Frequency of Class:

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Computing 1 week 1 week 2 hours
Lecture 9 weeks 1 week 2 hours
Lecture 1 week 1 week 1 hour
Workshop 2 weeks 1 week 2 hours

Usually two hours per week to include lectures and a lab visit.

Method of Assessment:

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 30.00 Individual Assignment - maximum 4 page report
Exam 1 70.00 1.5 hour exam

 

 


+20 credits of optional modules, of which 10 credits or more must be Level 4 modules.


 

Optional modules

Introduction to Aerospace Technology MM3AET

(10 credits) - autumn

Summary Of Content: The aim of this module is to provide an introduction to most of the main fields within Aerospace technology such that students understand the basics and are equipped to understand 'what there is to know' in this field. The main topics covered are:
  • A brief history of aircraft
  • Aerodynamics
  • An introduction to Aircraft Propulsion
  • An introduction to Flight dynamics
  • An introduction to aerospace materials and structures
  • A brief overview of Astronauts and Space
  • A brief introduction to Rotorcraft
  • Airworthiness
  • An introduction to Avionics
  • Future developments in aircraft

Method and Frequency of Class: 2-hour lectures in 11 weeks 

Method of Assessment:

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 30.00 Group submission (groups of 4)
Exam 1 70.00 one 2 hour exam
 

Introduction to Automotive Technology MM3AUT (10 credits) - autumn

Summary Of Content: For each of the following subject areas, the historical evolution of design of the component is considered with regard to the influences of performance optimisation, cost, and legislative requirements:
  • •Engine (i.c. types and development trends, fuel economy and emissions, alternative and hybrid powertrains)
  • •Transmission (manual and auto gearbox, differential, 2- and 4WD systems)
  • •Body/chassis (skeletal and unitary constructions, crashworthiness, aerodynamics)
  • •Control systems (steering and linkage, braking inc. ABS and traction/stability control)
  • •Suspension (arrangements, handling/dynamics)

Method and Frequency of Class: 2-hour leacture each week in 11 weeks. 
Activities may take place every teaching week of the Semester or only in specified weeks. It is usually specified above if an activity only takes place in some weeks of a Semester

Method of Assessment: one 2-hour exam (100%)

 

Flexible Automated Manufacture MM3FAM (10 credits) - autumn

Summary Of Content: This module gives students a detailed understanding of the important aspects of advanced automated manufacturing principles. Links to computer integrated manufacturing and implications of mass customisation on automated manufacturing systems are being explored. The impact of enterprise agility on their manufacturing facilities is being examined. Procedures for assessing the advantages and disadvantages of various systems are examined through the use of case studies.

Method and Frequency of Class:

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Lecture 11 weeks 1 week 2 hours
Seminar 10 weeks 1 week 2 hours
Workshop 8 weeks 1 week 2 hours

Activities may  take place every teaching week of the Semester or only in specified weeks. It is usually specified above if an activity only takes place in some weeks of a Semester.

Method of Assessment:

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 30.00 Group Project: FMS design for product families.
Coursework 2 10.00 Lab report
Exam 1 60.00 1.5 hour exam
 

Computer Modelling Techniques MM3CMT (20 credits) - autumn

Summary Of Content: Introduction to numerical methods in engineering, Finite Element Analysis (FEA) of structures, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for thermo-fluids problems. Coursework on running FEA and CFD software.

Method and Frequency of Class:

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Lecture 11 weeks 1 week 3 hours

 

Method of Assessment:

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 15.00 Finite Element Analysis (FEA) of structures, Coursework 1
Coursework 2 15.00 Coursework 2 - Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) 2
Exam 1 70.00 2 hour exam

 

 

Advanced Materials Characterisation MM4AMC (10 credits) - autumn

Summary Of Content: A broad approach is adopted covering the principles underpinning a wide range of materials characterisation techniques, for imaging, structural characterisation and chemical analysis. Emphasis is given to the process, structure, property interrelationship, backed up by appropriate case studies taken from the areas of structural materials, functional materials, biomaterials & nanomaterials. Detailed content underpinning the module includes particle / material interactions & wave / material interactions; the experimental process; crystallography; defects; reciprocal space & diffraction. Consideration is given to instrumentation, vacuum systems, electron sources and detectors etc and described with reference to the techniques of SEM, TEM, XRD, XRF and XPS. An overview of related surface analysis techniques and ion beam techniques is provided. Aspects of sample preparation, including FIB milling are also covered. 

Method and Frequency of Class:

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Lecture 11 weeks 1 week 2 hours
Practicum 8 weeks 2 week 3 hours

Method of Assessment:

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Laboratory 30.00 camera ready conference paper (4 pages)
Exam 1 70.00 2 hour exam
 

Surface Engineering Technology MM4SET (10 credits) - autumn

Summary Of Content: This module highlights the benefits of surface engineering before introducing the main surface engineering processes. These processes are classified into two categories, namely surface modification, and film/coating technologies. The most common processing methods are presented, along with some state-of-the-art development. These include surface treatment (e.g. induction hardening, laser surface hardening, and ion implantation, etc.), surface thermochemical processes (e.g. carburising, and nitriding, etc.), as well as surface coating processes: electrodeposition and electroless plating, thermal spraying, diffusion coatings, and vapour phase deposition (e.g. CVD and PVD). The selection criteria and applicability of each processing method are discussed. The lectures give an in-depth explanation of the process principle for each processing method. Case studies of surface engineering technology in different industrial applications are conducted.

Method and Frequency of Class: Two hours of lectures per week in 11 weeks.

Method of Assessment:

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 30.00 PowerPoint slides (approximate 10 slides) with an 8-minute oral presentation, and a 2000 word written report
Exam 1 70.00 Unseen (2 hours)
 

Internal Combustion Engines MM4ICE (10 credits) - autumn

Summary Of Content:
  • Design features, function and layout
  • Performance, efficiency and energy flows
  • Fuel delivery and gas exchange processes
  • Combustion, heat release and work transfer
  • Coolant system and heat rejection
  • Lubrication system and friction
  • Aftertreatment system, emissions and test regulations

Method and Frequency of Class: 2-hour lectures each week in 11 weeks.

Method of Assessment: one closed book examination (100%).

 

Introduction to Turbulence and Turbulent Flows MM4TTF (10 credits) - autumn

Summary Of Content: An advanced module in fluid mechanics applicable to a wide range of engineering disciplines. Topics to be covered include:
  • fundamental theory of turbulence
  • statistical description of turbulence
  • boundary layer structures
  • turbulent flow control
  • turbulence modelling and CFD
  • experimental techniques
  • practical and industrial examples 

Method and Frequency of Class:

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Lecture 11 weeks 1 week 2 hours
This module includes two case studies.

Method of Assessment:

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 30.00 Assessed extended laboratory report based on experimental data on turbulent boundary layer taken in the wind tunnel.  Covering & discussing points specified by the convenor.
Exam 1 70.00 Closed book examination.
 

Cognitive Ergonomics in Design MM4COG (10 credits) - autumn

Summary Of Content:
  • Cognitive psychology and ergonomics
  • The human as information processor: Memory and attention, mental models,
  • Human Workload
  • Displays, controls, consoles and control rooms
  • Decision making, automation
  • Situation awareness
  • Problem solving and artificial intelligence
  • Decision support systems, decision making biases,
  • Situated cognition and joint cognitive systems

Method and Frequency of Class: two hours of lectures per week in 11 weeks, two of these lectures are practical classes. 

Method of Assessment: one 2-hour examination ( 100%).

 

Biomedical Applications of Biomaterials MM4BAB (20 credits) - autumn

Course summary

This module is concerned with the biomedical application of materials. It addresses three key areas: 

1. The clinical need for materials in medicine. An outline of cases where disease and trauma can be treated using materials and the tissues involved. 

2. The biological responses to materials in the body. Specifically the effect of the biological environment on materials and the effect of implantation of materials on the body. 

3. The application of materials in medicine. The material requirements, surgical procedures and expected biological performance of biomaterials. The advantages and disadvantages of using different types of materials and the importance of the design of medical implants.

Taught semesters

Autumn UK

Delivery

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Lecture 11 weeks 1 week 2 hours
Practicum 11 weeks 1 week 2 hours

 

Assessment method

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 20.00 Laboratory report
Coursework 2 20.00 Clinical observation report
Exam 1 60.00 Closed book exam. 2 hours.

 

 

 

Aerospace Manufacturing Technology MM3AMT (10 credits) - spring

Summary Of Content: This module covers:
  • Basic airframe structure. Airframe component manufacturing techniques. Joining techniques. Assembly technology. Composite structures. Jigless assembly and automated manufacture.
  • Basic aero-engine structure. Geometry and material constraints. Manufacturing processes: forging, casting, welding & joining techniques, special processes, small and non round hole manufacture.
  • Certification, verification inspection and quality control.

Method and Frequency of Class:

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Lecture 12 weeks 1 week 2 hours

Two hours per week and one industrial visit.

Method of Assessment: one 2-hour exam (100%).

 

Fibre Reinforced Composites Engineering MM3FRC (10 credits) - spring

Summary Of Content: An introductory module on the design, manufacture and performance of fibre-reinforced composite materials. Constituent materials including fibres, resins and additives are described. Processing techniques and the relationships between process and design are highlighted. Design methodologies and computer-aided engineering techniques are demonstrated for component design. Case studies from a variety of industries including automotive and aerospace are presented.

Method and Frequency of Class: two hours of lectures per week in 12 weeks. 

Method of Assessment: a two-hour exam (100%) 

 

Finite Element Analysis MM4FEA (20 credits) - spring

Summary Of Content: An introductory module on finite element analysis, covering:
  • Structural analysis
  • Derivation of finite element equations using energy considerations
  • Linear and quadratic elements
  • Beam, plate and shell elements
  • Practical applications of finite elements in stress analysis problems
  • Examples of finite element applications
  • Introduction to thermal problems
  • Introduction to non-linear problems

This module does not cover computer programming or hands-on sessions on the use of commercial finite element software.

Method and Frequency of Class:

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Lecture 12 weeks 1 week 3 hours

Activities may take place every teaching week of the Semester or only in specified weeks. It is usually specified above if an activity only takes place in some weeks of a Semester.

Method of Assessment:

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 20.00 2 assignments
Exam 1 80.00 2 hour exam
 

Computational Fluid Dynamics MM4CFD (20 credits) - spring

Summary of Content: This module consists of:
  • Indroduction
  • Fundamental CFD theory
  • Turbulence
  • Multiphase
  • Reactive Flow
  • Quality Assurance

Method and Frequency of Class:

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Computing 8 weeks 1 week 2 hours
Lecture 11 weeks 2 week 1 hour
Un Assign 5 weeks 1 week 2 hours

Activities may take place every teaching week of the Semester or only in specified weeks. It is usually specified above if an activity only takes place in some weeks of a Semester.

Method of Assessment:

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 50.00 Individual project up to 4000 words
Exam 1 50.00 2-hour written examination
 

Joining Technology MM4JTN (10 credits) - spring

Summary Of Content: This module examines, in depth, the processes used for joining metallic (e.g. steel, aluminium and titanium alloys) and non-metallic (e.g. polymers and fibre reinforced composites) materials. Topics covered include: mechanical joining; adhesive bonding; soldering and brazing; solid state joining (friction welding and diffusion bonding); fusion welding (arc welding and the many classes thereof, resistance, electron beam and laser welding).
The fundamental characteristics of the various processes are examined along with procedures for practical applications. The origins of defects within joints and methods needed to control or eliminate them are also considered. The mechanical behaviour of joints is analysed, as is the effect of joining on the microstructural characteristics and mechanical properties of the base materials. Other features such as residual stress and distortion are addressed. Attention is also given to appropriate design for manufacture in a modern manufacturing context.

Method and Frequency of Class: two hours lectures per week in 12 weeks.

Method of Assessment:

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 25.00 Case study review
Exam 1 75.00 1hour 30 minute unseen written exam
 

Analysis and Design of Composites MM4ADC (10 credits) - spring

Summary Of Content: Heterogeneity of composites (fibre and matrix at microscale and layup of plies at mesoscale); anisotropic behaviour (classification of completely anisotropic, monoclinic, orthotropic, transversely isotropic and isotropic); constitutive relationship (stress-strain relationship for anisotropic materials); thermal stresses (constitutive relationship in presence of temperature change); laminate analysis (classic laminate theory, advanced laminate theories); finite element approach (shell, solid, continuum shell); failure criteria (maximum stress, Tsai-Wu, Hashin, Puck, Overview of WWFEs); design of composite laminates (simplified analysis, basic design rules and practices), layup optimisation (concept of optimization, Matlab optimisation toolbox, strength and other constraints).

Method and Frequency of Class:

ActivityNumber of WeeksNumber of sessionsDuration of a session
Computing 2 weeks 1 week 3 hours
Lecture 12 weeks 1 week 2 hours

One piece of coursework of design and analysis of a laminated structure to be tested through a physical or numerical experiment.

Method of Assessment:

Assessment TypeWeightRequirements
Coursework 1 50.00 Individual assignment
Exam 1 50.00 1.5 hour examination
 

Technologies for the Hydrogen Transport Economy MM4HYE (10 credits) - spring

Summary Of Content: This module considers:
  • Hydrogen use in the transport and energy sectors
  • Sustainable sources of Hydrogen
  • Hydrogen storage and distribution
  • Fuel cell technologies
  • Hydrogen Vehicles
  • Grid stability and decarbonisation of heat applications
  • Economic and environmental feasibility assessment

Taught Semesters: Spring UK 

Method and Frequency of Class: 2-hour lectures in 10 weeks

Method of Assessment: 1 Examination (100%) -  2 hours

 

The above is a sample of the typical modules that we offer but is not intended to be construed and/or relied upon as a definitive list of the modules that will be available in any given year. Due to the passage of time between commencement of the course and subsequent years of the course, modules may change due to developments in the curriculum and information is provided for indicative purposes only.

 
 

Fees and funding

Additional costs

 

As a student on this course, there are no additional costs for your budget, apart from your tuition fees and living expenses. Lab and safety equipment is provided for free by the Department.

You should be able to access all of the books you’ll need through our libraries and it is not usual for students to buy their own copies. Any field trips are also funded by the Department. Please note that these figures are approximate and subject to change.

Funding your masters

 

See information on how to fund your masters, including our step-by-step guide.

Please visit the faculty website for information on any scholarships currently available through the faculty.

Faculty of Engineering Postgraduate Scholarships

UK/EU Students

Funding information can be found on the Graduate School website.

Please visit the faculty website for information on any scholarships currently available through the faculty.

Government loans for masters courses

Masters student loans of up to £10,906 are available for taught and research masters courses. Applicants must ordinarily live in the UK or EU.

International and EU students

Masters scholarships are available for international and EU students from a wide variety of countries and areas of study. You must already have an offer to study at Nottingham to apply. Please note closing dates to ensure you apply for your course with enough time.

Information and advice on funding your degree, living costs and working while you study is available on our website, as well as country-specific resources.


For those who wish to opt for the Aerospace stream, Aerospace MSc Bursaries are available from the Royal Academy of Engineering.

 
 

Careers and professional development

On completion of the course you will have the skills suitable for a wide range of careers concerned with product structural integrity and failure analysis of materials in sectors such as aerospace and automotive.

Students in the department have gone on to a variety of different careers, including civil engineers, engineering technicians, quality assurance and regulation officers and engineering professionals.

As well as offering you the chance to pursue a fulfilling career within industry and related areas, the MSc programmes offered by the department provide an excellent foundation for further research and a significant number of our students continue their studies to PhD level and beyond.

 

Average starting salary and career progression

In 2017, 92.3% of postgraduates in the department who were available for employment had secured work or further study within six months of graduation. The average starting salary was £28,000 with the highest being £32,000.

* Known destinations of full-time home higher degree postgraduates, 2016/17. Salaries are calculated based on the median of those in full-time paid employment within the UK.

Career Prospects and Employability

The University of Nottingham is consistently named as one of the most targeted universities by Britain’s leading graduate employers* and can offer you a head-start when it comes to your career.

Our Careers and Employability Service offers a range of services including advice sessions, employer events, recruitment fairs and skills workshops – and once you have graduated, you will have access to the service for life.

* The Graduate Market 2013-2017, High Fliers Research 

 
 
 

Disclaimer
This online prospectus has been drafted in advance of the academic year to which it applies. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information is accurate at the time of publishing, but changes (for example to course content) are likely to occur given the interval between publishing and commencement of the course. It is therefore very important to check this website for any updates before you apply for the course where there has been an interval between you reading this website and applying.

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